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Mk 9: 30-37

Who is wise and understanding among you? Show by your good life that your works are done with gentleness born of wisdom. But if you have bitter envy and selfish ambition in your hearts, do not be boastful and false to the truth. Such wisdom does not come down from above, but is earthly, unspiritual, devilish. 

For where there is envy and selfish ambition, there will also be disorder and wickedness of every kind. But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits, without a trace of partiality or hypocrisy. And a harvest of righteousness is sown in peace for those who make peace.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Being Sacraments

We are sacraments for one another. When we open our hearts to welcome, appreciate, and love another person, we encounter God in them, and they encounter God in us.

However, like the disciples in today’s Gospel, when we are so full of ourselves and our own concerns for power and prestige, there’s little room for God to become present to us or to those around us.

When we interact with family, co-workers, classmates, friends, or strangers, rather than asking What can I gain from this person?, Jesus invites us to ask: How can I appreciate and love this person? 

Yes, this kind of living may lead, as it did for Jesus, to suffering. But wouldn’t we rather live, rejoice, and suffer together than succeed (or fail) alone? 

How can you encounter other people today as the sacrament that they are? How can you be a sacrament, revealing God to them?

—Thomas Bambrick, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Midwest Province studying at the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University in Berkeley, CA.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

Jesus, our companion and our model,
help us to be sacraments for each other—
encountering God and revealing God
through our welcome, appreciation, and love—
just as you were and are a sacrament for us.

—Thomas Bambrick, SJ


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

“The goal of the spiritual life, as Ignatius conceived it, is to ‘choose what better leads to God’s deepening life in me.” This is a dynamic goal…Most of the time this means that we are to join with God in active work in the world. This active life rests on a foundation of reflection.” (Excerpt from What is Ignatian Spirituality? By David L. Fleming, S.J.)

 

At Saint Ignatius High School, there is much emphasis put on the active work accomplished by students through academics, athletics, service, arts and extracurricular clubs. Each day, the Ignatius community pauses at 1:20 p.m. for five minutes to reflect on that active work- to pray the examen prayer. The prayer is read by students, faculty or staff. Ignatius encouraged the Jesuits to make the examen a daily habit. We invite you to share in this practice by listening to the live broadcast and/or archives of the examen prayers of the school year. Click here to listen to the live daily examen (weekday) 1:20 p.m. EST broadcast and archived recordings of the Daily Examen.

 

The examen that Ignatius outlined in the Spiritual Exercises has five points: 1) be grateful for God’s blessings; 2) ask the help of the Spirit; 3) review the day, looking for times when God has been present and times when you have left him out; 4) express sorrow for sin and ask for God’s forgiving love; 5) pray for the grace to be more totally available to God who loves you so totally.

We invite you to pray with us

Saint Ignatius High School is alive with activity and God’s graces daily. Within those activities, all are reminded that God is present in the daily routines of class, work, home and social life. One way students are reminded of God’s presence is through the daily pause for the examen prayer, a contemplative prayer structure gifted to us through the founder of the Jesuits, St. Ignatius of Loyola. Through the Spiritual Exercises St. Ignatius shows us we can find God in all things, and we are encouraged to enter a relationship with Christ. May you draw closer to God through this prayer site, and may it assist you in reminding you of God’s presence in our daily activities.



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    In addition to the Jesuit community and students from Saint Ignatius High School dedicating intentional prayer time for all your requests, prayers for the sick will also take place on Tuesday mornings during the Gonzaga Society of Prayer at 7:30 a.m. in the St. Mary of the Assumption Chapel.

DAILY INSPIRATION

February 25, 2020

Scripture

Mk 9: 30-37

Who is wise and understanding among you? Show by your good life that your works are done with gentleness born of wisdom. But if you have bitter envy and selfish ambition in your hearts, do not be boastful and false to the truth. Such wisdom does not come down from above, but is earthly, unspiritual, devilish. 

For where there is envy and selfish ambition, there will also be disorder and wickedness of every kind. But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, willing to yield, full of mercy and good fruits, without a trace of partiality or hypocrisy. And a harvest of righteousness is sown in peace for those who make peace.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Ignatian Reflection

Being Sacraments

We are sacraments for one another. When we open our hearts to welcome, appreciate, and love another person, we encounter God in them, and they encounter God in us.

However, like the disciples in today’s Gospel, when we are so full of ourselves and our own concerns for power and prestige, there’s little room for God to become present to us or to those around us.

When we interact with family, co-workers, classmates, friends, or strangers, rather than asking What can I gain from this person?, Jesus invites us to ask: How can I appreciate and love this person? 

Yes, this kind of living may lead, as it did for Jesus, to suffering. But wouldn’t we rather live, rejoice, and suffer together than succeed (or fail) alone? 

How can you encounter other people today as the sacrament that they are? How can you be a sacrament, revealing God to them?

—Thomas Bambrick, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic of the Midwest Province studying at the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University in Berkeley, CA.

 


Prayer

Jesus, our companion and our model,
help us to be sacraments for each other—
encountering God and revealing God
through our welcome, appreciation, and love—
just as you were and are a sacrament for us.

—Thomas Bambrick, SJ

PRAYER REQUESTS

    In addition to the Jesuit community and students from Saint Ignatius High School dedicating intentional prayer time for all your requests, prayers for the sick will also take place on Friday mornings during the Gonzaga Society of Prayer at 7:30 a.m. in the St. Mary of the Assumption Chapel. Also, during the month of November, our community will pray in a special way for the deceased relatives and friends of those in our Saint Ignatius community.

DAILY EXAMEN

The Daily Examen is a prayer technique developed by St. Ignatius to help us reflect on the events of the day to discern God’s presence and direction. When Ignatius founded the Society of Jesus, he required the Jesuits to practice the Examen twice daily—at noon and at the end of the day. It’s a habit that Jesuits, and many other Christians, practice to this day.

The Examen structure presented below is adapted from a technique described by Ignatius Loyola in his Spiritual Exercises. Click here for more information from our partners in ministry at Loyola Press.

Daily Examen

1. Become aware of God’s presence

God, I believe that at this moment I am in your presence and you are loving me.

2. Review the day with gratitude

God, you know my needs better than I know them. Give me your light and your help to see how you have been with me, both yesterday and today.

3. Pay attention to your emotions

God, help me to be grateful for the moments when people have affirmed me and challenged me. Help me to see how I have responded, and whether I have been kind to others and open to growth.

4. Choose one feature of the day and pray from it

God, forgive me for when I have not done my best or have failed to treat others well. Encourage me, guide me, and continue to bless me.

5. Look toward tomorrow

As I look to the remainder of this day, make me aware that you are with me. Show me how to be the person you want me to be.

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