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Jn 14: 27-31a

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.

You heard me say to you, ‘I am going away, and I am coming to you.’ If you loved me, you would rejoice that I am going to the Father, because the Father is greater than I. And now I have told you this before it occurs, so that when it does occur, you may believe.

I will no longer talk much with you, for the ruler of this world is coming. He has no power over me;but I do as the Father has commanded me, so that the world may know that I love the Father. Rise, let us be on our way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

The gift of peace

My morning ritual involves a quick perusal of the headlines of the New York Times. I scroll until I find a story with some semblance of hope. Sometimes it takes until the Arts & Leisure section. Other times it doesn’t happen at all.

The “world” doesn’t come off too hot in today’s Gospel, and I can see why. Our planet seems to be on the verge of catastrophe. Millions of refugees are displaced from their homelands. War continues be waged in Afghanistan, Yemen, and South Sudan. I don’t know the “ruler of this world” to whom Jesus is referring, but whoever it is not doing a very good job.

And yet, amid all this strife, God offers us the gift of peace. It is not a false peace that denies our problems. Instead, it is a reminder that we are created for something more than this world. May we find in this promise renewed vigor to bring as much love and hope that we can to a world that desperately needs it.

—Dan Dixon, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic from the Midwest Province currently working at Saint Ignatius High School in Cleveland to create the Welsh Academy, a grades 6-8 middle school for families of modest economic means.

 


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

Prayer

What I would like to leave behind is a simple prayer that each of you may find what I have found – God’s special gift to us all: the gift of peace. When we are at peace, we find the freedom to be most fully who we are, even in the worst of times. We let go of what is nonessential and embrace what is essential. We empty ourselves so that God may more fully work within us. And we become instruments in the hands of the Lord.

—From Joseph Cardinal Bernadin’s A Gift of Peace


Please share the Good Word with your friends!

“The goal of the spiritual life, as Ignatius conceived it, is to ‘choose what better leads to God’s deepening life in me.” This is a dynamic goal…Most of the time this means that we are to join with God in active work in the world. This active life rests on a foundation of reflection.” (Excerpt from What is Ignatian Spirituality? By David L. Fleming, S.J.)

 

At Saint Ignatius High School, there is much emphasis put on the active work accomplished by students through academics, athletics, service, arts and extracurricular clubs. Each day, the Ignatius community pauses at 1:20 p.m. for five minutes to reflect on that active work- to pray the examen prayer. The prayer is read by students, faculty or staff. Ignatius encouraged the Jesuits to make the examen a daily habit. We invite you to share in this practice by listening to the live broadcast and/or archives of the examen prayers of the school year. Click here to listen to the live daily examen (weekday) 1:20 p.m. EST broadcast and archived recordings of the Daily Examen.

 

The examen that Ignatius outlined in the Spiritual Exercises has five points: 1) be grateful for God’s blessings; 2) ask the help of the Spirit; 3) review the day, looking for times when God has been present and times when you have left him out; 4) express sorrow for sin and ask for God’s forgiving love; 5) pray for the grace to be more totally available to God who loves you so totally.

We invite you to pray with us

Saint Ignatius High School is alive with activity and God’s graces daily. Within those activities, all are reminded that God is present in the daily routines of class, work, home and social life. One way students are reminded of God’s presence is through the daily pause for the examen prayer, a contemplative prayer structure gifted to us through the founder of the Jesuits, St. Ignatius of Loyola. Through the Spiritual Exercises St. Ignatius shows us we can find God in all things, and we are encouraged to enter a relationship with Christ. May you draw closer to God through this prayer site, and may it assist you in reminding you of God’s presence in our daily activities.



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    In addition to the Jesuit community and students from Saint Ignatius High School dedicating intentional prayer time for all your requests, prayers for the sick will also take place on Tuesday mornings during the Gonzaga Society of Prayer at 7:30 a.m. in the St. Mary of the Assumption Chapel.

DAILY INSPIRATION

May 21, 2019

Scripture

Jn 14: 27-31a

Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.

You heard me say to you, ‘I am going away, and I am coming to you.’ If you loved me, you would rejoice that I am going to the Father, because the Father is greater than I. And now I have told you this before it occurs, so that when it does occur, you may believe.

I will no longer talk much with you, for the ruler of this world is coming. He has no power over me;but I do as the Father has commanded me, so that the world may know that I love the Father. Rise, let us be on our way.

New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989, by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved. USCCB approved.

 


Ignatian Reflection

The gift of peace

My morning ritual involves a quick perusal of the headlines of the New York Times. I scroll until I find a story with some semblance of hope. Sometimes it takes until the Arts & Leisure section. Other times it doesn’t happen at all.

The “world” doesn’t come off too hot in today’s Gospel, and I can see why. Our planet seems to be on the verge of catastrophe. Millions of refugees are displaced from their homelands. War continues be waged in Afghanistan, Yemen, and South Sudan. I don’t know the “ruler of this world” to whom Jesus is referring, but whoever it is not doing a very good job.

And yet, amid all this strife, God offers us the gift of peace. It is not a false peace that denies our problems. Instead, it is a reminder that we are created for something more than this world. May we find in this promise renewed vigor to bring as much love and hope that we can to a world that desperately needs it.

—Dan Dixon, SJ, is a Jesuit scholastic from the Midwest Province currently working at Saint Ignatius High School in Cleveland to create the Welsh Academy, a grades 6-8 middle school for families of modest economic means.

 


Prayer

What I would like to leave behind is a simple prayer that each of you may find what I have found – God’s special gift to us all: the gift of peace. When we are at peace, we find the freedom to be most fully who we are, even in the worst of times. We let go of what is nonessential and embrace what is essential. We empty ourselves so that God may more fully work within us. And we become instruments in the hands of the Lord.

—From Joseph Cardinal Bernadin’s A Gift of Peace

PRAYER REQUESTS

    In addition to the Jesuit community and students from Saint Ignatius High School dedicating intentional prayer time for all your requests, prayers for the sick will also take place on Friday mornings during the Gonzaga Society of Prayer at 7:30 a.m. in the St. Mary of the Assumption Chapel. Also, during the month of November, our community will pray in a special way for the deceased relatives and friends of those in our Saint Ignatius community.

DAILY EXAMEN

The Daily Examen is a prayer technique developed by St. Ignatius to help us reflect on the events of the day to discern God’s presence and direction. When Ignatius founded the Society of Jesus, he required the Jesuits to practice the Examen twice daily—at noon and at the end of the day. It’s a habit that Jesuits, and many other Christians, practice to this day.

The Examen structure presented below is adapted from a technique described by Ignatius Loyola in his Spiritual Exercises. Click here for more information from our partners in ministry at Loyola Press.

Daily Examen

1. Become aware of God’s presence

God, I believe that at this moment I am in your presence and you are loving me.

2. Review the day with gratitude

God, you know my needs better than I know them. Give me your light and your help to see how you have been with me, both yesterday and today.

3. Pay attention to your emotions

God, help me to be grateful for the moments when people have affirmed me and challenged me. Help me to see how I have responded, and whether I have been kind to others and open to growth.

4. Choose one feature of the day and pray from it

God, forgive me for when I have not done my best or have failed to treat others well. Encourage me, guide me, and continue to bless me.

5. Look toward tomorrow

As I look to the remainder of this day, make me aware that you are with me. Show me how to be the person you want me to be.

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